STROKE & BELL'S PALSY

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Stroke

A stroke—a decrease in blood flow to the brain due to a clot or bleeding—is a medical emergency. And doctors often say “time is brain,” meaning the quicker you get treatment, the less likely it is that your brain tissue will be permanently damaged. About 80% of strokes are due to a clot (ischemic strokes) and the rest are due to bleeding in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke).

 

There are treatments available for stroke that need to be provided within the first 3-4 hours, such as clot-busting medications

Signs that you may be having a stroke:

Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body

Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding

Sudden trouble seeing or blurred vision in one or both eyes

Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination

Sudden severe headache with no known cause

Bells Palsy

Bell's palsy is a paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of your face. Damage to the facial nerve that controls muscles on one side of the face causes that side of your face to droop . The nerve damage may also affect your sense of taste and how you make tears and saliva. This condition comes on suddenly, often overnight, and usually gets better on its own within a few weeks.

 

Bell's palsy is not the result of a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). While stroke and TIA can cause facial paralysis, there is no link between Bell's palsy and either of these conditions. But sudden weakness that occurs on one side of your face should be checked by a doctor right away to rule out these more serious causes.

 

The cause of Bell's palsy is not clear. Most cases are thought to be caused by the herpes virus that causes cold sores. In most cases of Bell's palsy, the nerve that controls muscles on one side of the face is damaged by inflammation. Many health problems can cause weakness or paralysis of the face. If a specific reason cannot be found for the weakness, the condition is called Bell's palsy.

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The knee is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. The knee joins the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). The smaller bone that runs alongside the tibia (fibula) and the kneecap (patella) are the other bones that make the knee joint.

Tendons connect the knee bones to the leg muscles that move the knee joint. Ligaments join the knee bones and provide stability to the knee:

  • The anterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding backward on the tibia (or the tibia sliding forward on the femur).

  • The posterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding forward on the tibia (or the tibia from sliding backward on the femur).

  • The medial and lateral collateral ligaments prevent the femur from sliding side to side.

  • Two C-shaped pieces of cartilage called the medial and lateral menisci act as shock absorbers between the femur and tibia.

  • Numerous bursae, or fluid-filled sacs, help the knee move smoothly.

Contact us

Yes Acupuncture & Chiropractic

Tel: (770) 497-0882

Fax: (770) 497-0861
Email : acu-chiro@yesclinicga.com

2005 Boggs Rd #104-107 
Duluth, GA 30096

 

Hours

By Appointment Only

Mon.Wed.Fri: 9:00am - 7:00pm

Tue.Thur: 9:00am - 6:00pm

Saturday: 9:00am - 1:00pm

Holiday Hours

New Year's Day - Closed

Memorial Day - Closed

Independence Day - Closed

Labor Day - Closed

Thanksgiving Day - Closed

Christmas Day - Closed